• Melissa Rosales

The appeal of the Winter Hill Night Market

Published for The Somerville Times July 24 2019 Issue

Link to story: http://www.thesomervilletimes.com/archives/92886

Click here for newspaper copy.




Locals, craft makers, and vendors gathered together on Saturday, July 20, to celebrate the Winter Hill Night Market located beside Winter Hill Brewing Company. The pop-up market is the last of the roaming night market series organized by the Somerville Arts Council and the Somerville Flea for this year.


The free event was available to all ages. Several vendors sold vintage and artisan wares like vinyl records, handmade jewelry, and embroidered artwork. Attendees enjoyed cool beer from the Winter Hill Brewing Company tent while listening to live music from Dan Blakeslee, Hillbilly Holiday, and Danielle Miraglia from 5:00 to 10:00 p.m.


When asked what brings her to the night market, Emily Marvullo said, “Well, I live two blocks away and I saw on Instagram that this was happening so I just popped down to see what local craftsmen are doing.”


Marvullo enjoyed a cold bottle of pink lemonade from Neighborhood Produce while remarking on the many interesting works from local craftsmen like Conor Waligory.


Waligory sells handmade dyed shirts, backpacks, paintings, and other apparel. He lives just a mile away from the market and says he is happy to be a part of it. Waligory said the event is more important to him than his nine-to-five job.


“This is what I want to do in my life rather than what I do and make a living so being a part of these things are very important,” Waligory said.


In another booth, intricate jewelry made with recycled glass was sold by Carolina Portillo. She works by herself all day long to run her business. She enjoys events like these because she can meet customers and observe the reactions to her designs.


“I’m a crafter. This is what I make. This is what I enjoy making, and also this is how I make a living. These markets are the way I can interact with customers,” Portillo said.


Candice Oyer lives just down the street from the event. She bought an embroidered art piece as a gift and old newspaper clippings from the 70s about the moon landing.


“I really love it,” Oyer said. “I think it brings the community together and it’s just a nice all around event for the neighborhood.”